Joy in the Streets

Parades are getting old, but no team (since the 2004 Red Sox) has deserved a parade as much as this one.

Are there lessons for Democrats? I think so. A reminder …

Look, All I Ask Is that the Democratic Party Be as Good as the Patriots

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Discuss

12 Comments . Leave a comment below.
  1. Комментарий для добавления видимости

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  2. Sorry, no sale

    I think that our obsession with sports is a major contributor to the cultural attitudes that put Donald Trump in office. Too many Americans put governance and politics in the same emotional and cultural bin as football — your side is always right, the other side is always wrong, and “victory” is the only thing that matters.

    Parades ARE getting old. I, frankly, much prefer the attitude of Joe Gibbs (retired coach of the Washington Redskins). He retired after winning his third super bowl (and failing to hold the title in the following year) — he said, in essence, that he was ready for something new.

    I prefer the candor and priorities of Joe Gibbs.

    • That's not really the point

      I’m not saying politics should be more like sports.

      But, in the area where politics is like sports (one team facing another), Democrats should be more like the Patriots. From the original post:

      Like all of us, they have had ups and downs. But they usually just win. And some of us are old enough to remember when they just lost (or just finished 8-8).

      So … politics. Of course politics isn’t football (or any other game). There are subtleties, nuances, shifting winds. But like we always say, the choice couldn’t be clearer. Broadening that to the entire party, the direction couldn’t be clearer. In that sense, the metaphor fits.

      We remember Ted Kennedy fondly because he always moved in the right direction. He’d work with Republicans on their bills to make them better, or at least less bad. He’d negotiate, he’d befriend people on the other side, he enjoyed the work, and he pushed and pushed (and they respected him for that). We have yet to recover from his loss.

      Who’s doing that now? Maybe someone, I don’t know. But it still feels like we compromise too much. We would have decided to settle for two wins. The Patriots already have three, and a good shot at four.

      It’s a metaphor not a marriage of the realms. And all metaphors break down, but you get the idea.

      • hmm...

        We remember Ted Kennedy fondly because he always moved in the right direction. He’d work with Republicans on their bills to make them better, or at least less bad. He’d negotiate, he’d befriend people on the other side, he enjoyed the work, and he pushed and pushed (and they respected him for that). We have yet to recover from his loss.

        …We should remember that, when Ted Kennedy begana in the Senate — in 1962 — his method of working (and playing) well with others was, more or less, the natural order of things: the give and take, and the give and get and all the pushing and mutual respect and befriending the ‘opposition’ was de rigeur, on both sides of the aisle. I’m not sure I could fault present day politicians for not being steadfast in that model… Why? Because In the nineties the Republicans stopped doing that. They found they liked blowing things up and holding their breath and saying “nonononononononononono.” Now, it’s their only game plan. They have no other ideas besides ‘no’. That’s it. They broke it. We’ve tried repeatedly to fix it. They keep breaking it.

  3. I can't see any lesson for Democrats here

    The game of football does not resemble American politics even superficially. It’s a modern day gladiatorial sport that serves as a monumental distraction from the things that really matter. Our so-called President, the best buddy of Brady, Belichick, and Kraft, is busy ruining the country while New England sports fans have their eyes glued to their TV sets. Football is to modern America what the circus was to ancient Rome. And Trump is our very own Caligula.

    • Interesting

      It’s a modern day gladiatorial sport that serves as a monumental distraction from the things that really matter.

      That sounds a bit like politics to me.

  4. Here's one lesson

    People like football. They like the home team. What they don’t tend to like is people who insult their sport loudly, or decide to root against the home team over a certain player’s politics.

    And when the person who turned their nose up at the home team comes back trying to be buddy-buddy about politics, it doesn’t have an impact. Conservatives have contempt for the working person and don’t often display it; progressives don’t and too often seem to.

    sabutai   @   Thu 9 Feb 4:14 PM
    • I heard it suggested during the Super Bowl...

      …that very few Dems would be rooting for the Patriots due to the affinities of Brady, Belichick, and Kraft for Trump. This makes no sense. Given that the Pats represent some of the most Democratic areas of the country I suspect statistically plenty of Dems were rooting for the Pats.

      • This is exactly the kind of assumption

        we should do our best to smash. Thanks for bringing it up, Christoper.

        The other side might want to divide everything up to our side and their side, but good people can disagree AND agree on things. Everything shouldn’t be divided into us and them. There are more to our lives than Republican and Democrat. Tom Brady is the greatest quarterback ever. Is he the greatest human being ever? The wisest man? His political judgement means little or nothing to me. The point is, sports is one place where we can come together. We need to come together as much as possible. We can disagree. We can argue, but we are a country. We don’t need partitions, real or imaginary.

    • Here here

      Just as Governor or Senator Coakley

    • some

      conservatives are working people

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