terrymcginty

- Kid from Lynn - Criminal Defense Atty. - NDI Trainer, Dem.Rep.Congo, Colombia - Country Director, NDI Tajikistan - NDI Trainer, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan - Public Service Fellow, Harvard Kennedy School - Fmr. Member Democratic State Committee - Legal Fellow, Senator Edward M. Kennedy - Honored to have driven the great Elsie Frank (Barney's mother) to campaign events a quarter-century ago

Person #7766: 73 Posts

Recommended: 169 times

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  1. If (0 Replies)

    If he were a normal President who accepted the constitution, yes. Because he is who he is, ABSOLUTELY NOT. By the same logic, let’s just adopt China’s system. After all, they’ve had much higher job growth for several decades now. If people are even considering such a Faustian bargain, we are finished.

  2. Danger (1 Reply)

    He’s a clear and present danger to the constitution, our national security, the environment, and our civil rights.

  3. Nothing Against the Boy Scouts... (0 Replies)

    …since I was one (First Class – couldn’t do the knots).

    But it’s not good to pretend you’re innocent when you’re not. It is a thing of beauty to watch the questioning of Judge Gorsuch by Sen. Franken just now on C-Span. Franken undressed the ersatz veil of political innocence carefully designed to shroud Judge Gorsuch’s face, by citing to Gorsuch his own resume, which amply demonstrates that Gorsuch was 100% political for literally decades on end.

    This included volunteering as a lawyer for the Bush campaign during its notorious campaign in Ohio in 2004, when the campaign not only began its current campaign of voter suppression, with mammoth lines that were an international embarrassment (I know. I was in Tajikistan for that year), and which also featured the shameless pairing of anti-marriage equality referenda to boost right-wing turnout.

    There is nothing wrong with volunteering as a lawyer in various roles in a campaign. I did it myself for Obama in Portsmouth in 2008 and 2012. But Gorsuch’s act of golly-gee purity from partisan politics was an outright fraud, and this fraud was rightly disrupted by Franken. A political Boy Scout he is not.

    terrymcginty @ Sat 25 Mar 1:34 PM

  4. Nothing Against the Boy Scouts... (0 Replies)

    …since I was one (First Class – couldn’t do the knots).

    But, it is a thing beauty to watch the questioning of Judge Gorsuch by Sen. Franken just now on C-Span. Franken undressed the ersatz veil of political innocence carefully designed to shroud Judge Gorsuch’s face, by citing to Gorsuch his own resume, which amply demonstrates that Gorsuch was 100% political for literally decades on end.

    This included volunteering as a lawyer for the Bush campaign during its notorious campaign in Ohio in 2004, when the campaign not only began its current campaign of voter suppression, with mammoth lines that were an international embarrassment (I know. I was in Tajikistan for that year), and which also featured the shameless pairing of anti-marriage equality referenda to boost right-wing turnout.

    There is nothing wrong with volunteering as a lawyer in various roles in a campaign. I did it myself for Obama in Portsmouth in 2008 and 2012. But Gorsuch’s act of golly-gee purity from partisan politics was an outright fraud, and this fraud was rightly disrupted by Franken. A political Boy Scout he is not.

  5. Exactly (1 Reply)

    You hit it on the head charley-on-the-mta. That’s what he is there for: to protect wealthy interests against the riff-raff.

    Originalism is largely fraudulent and a convenient smokescreen. A true originalist should oppose not only Roe v. Wade, but also Brown v. Topeka Bd. of Education (desegregation of public schools) and Griswold v. Connecticut (right to privacy – birth control), but they do not, instead finding various justifications that actually violate originalist principles.

  6. Stench (0 Replies)

    It’s a full-out stench, not a whiff. Historians are so cautious.

  7. No. (0 Replies)

    No. There’s something called the First Amendment. We don’t ban flags in this country. It makes my blood boil every time I see it out here in conservative Worcester County (because it is spitting on the graves of all of the Union forces buried just miles away), but ban a flag? No. Freedom of speech to wave the flag of your choice is what those Union soldiers died for my friends.

  8. Disgrace (0 Replies)

    It’s such a disgrace to see all of the Irish surnames in this White House. The Prime Minister of Ireland’s undressing of President Trumpovitch was welcome relief.

  9. Beyond the Abstract (0 Replies)

    My argument is largely abstract. Anecdotally, as a musician I know the seemingly infinite well of spiritual sustenance that the arts can provide. But I hope that those who promote arts education might chime in sometime in the future regarding the actual data showing the tremendous efficiency and value of a dollar spent on arts education.

    In my case anyway, I know that studying music taught me self-control, discipline, patience, perseverance, European history, physics, and to some extent at least, literary history. I am an expert in none of these, but having a generalists familiarity with them has provided more stimulation, satisfaction, and at times, peace, then I can possibly state here.

    Particularly for those from poor and working-class backgrounds like myself, the arts are a more realistic ‘way out’ than sports in part because of some of the interdisciplinary knowledge that can come through osmosis with the study of the arts, although sports can have many of the very same benefits.

  10. Frill (0 Replies)

    No. The problem is the American tendency to see the Arts as a private FRILL instead of a cultural necessity. It was just this tendency that JFK was fighting.

  11. American (0 Replies)

    No. The problem is the American tendency to see the Arts as a private drill instead of a cultural necessity. It was just this tendency that JFK was fighting.

  12. Next (0 Replies)

    Yes, and we’re trying to figure how to win the next one. That is not a waste of time.

  13. Why? (0 Replies)

    Why is that “sad”?

    Is there something inferior about Vermont Socialists?

  14. Footbridges (0 Replies)

    Okay. But just make you build plenty of foot bridges over it!

  15. Idolatrous to Deify the Market Over Ideas? (0 Replies)

    I think somervilletom is right. Let’s give the arts the commitment that Porcupine would like, and then see how close we get to the commitment to the arts Porcupine assumed those largely unfortunate countries are able to muster today?

    Porcupine, some sense of context actually is helpful, as are facts, as opposed to propaganda created out of ignorance and fear manufactured at the whim of your leader.

  16. No, Thank You, Porcupine (1 Reply)

    I’ve been to the Congo, Porcupine, and would not want the political party leaders I met there, who were so very gracious, to think that all Americans would be so stereotypically arrogant as to assume that the DRC had no arts programs. I’d recommend you not get in touch with them for the good of our reputation there. Perhaps you assume that the Belgians did better?

  17. Syria (0 Replies)

    Anyone who knows the first thing about Syria prior to the conflagration knows that Syria undoubtedly had a commitment to the arts.

  18. Media (0 Replies)

    “The media response to this speech is reminiscent of a parent praising a child for defecating in the toilet for the first time.”
    -Tom Bonier

  19. Media Brainless (1 Reply)

    What’s most striking about the speech was the media’s reaction to it. You would’ve thought the Trump was a new man. Endlessly repeated was the question, “which is the real Donald Trump?” This is absurd on its face. The real Donald Trump reveals himself constantly on Twitter. We know who the real Donald Trump is. The Donald Trump of the other night was reading a Teleprompter. End of story.